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MoMA

K–12 STUDENTS

CONTACT US

Schedule a Group Visit:
Phone (212) 708-9685
Fax (212) 408-6398
groupservices@moma.org

Group Services Department
MoMA
11 West 53 Street
New York, NY 10019

Group Reservation Form

CONTACT SCHOOL PROGRAMS

schoolprograms@moma.org

ABOUT LEARNING AT MoMA

Make MoMA your classroom. Learn to look closely, discuss art, and think critically.

Your students will:

  • Listen and learn from each other
  • Make connections to your classroom experience
  • Explore works of art through themes that are relevant, engaging, and thought-provoking

We will begin accepting reservations for the fall semester after September 2, 2014

Step 1

Choose a Program

Step 2

Choose a Theme

Step 3

Make a Reservation


Programs

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One-Part: MoMA Visit

Explore three to four works of art in-depth
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Learn more about the visit.

Once your visit is scheduled, a MoMA educator will contact you to further tailor the visit and lesson to meet your needs.

Duration

Grades K–3: one hour
Grades 4–12: 75 min.

Group Size
Up to 30 students; three to five chaperones
Who

K–12 students

Fees
See Fees
Booking
Four weeks advance notice required
Notes
Monday–Friday only
Sound Amplification Available
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Art Studio

Visit the galleries and then make art
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Learn more about the visit.

Once your visit is scheduled, a MoMA educator will contact you to further tailor the visit and lesson to meet your needs.

Duration

Three hours

Discussion in MoMA galleries, followed by art-making studio session

Group Size
Up to 30 students; three to five chaperones
Who

K–12 students of all art-making abilities

Time
Start at 9:30 or 10:00 a.m.; includes one forty-minute break for students to eat their own brown bag lunches
Fees
See Fees
Booking
Four weeks advance notice required
Notes
Monday–Friday only
Sound Amplification Available
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Two-Part Program

One in-school pre-visit lesson and one MoMA visit
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Learn more about the visit.

Once your visit is scheduled, a MoMA educator will contact you to further tailor the visit and lesson to meet your needs.

What

One in-school pre-visit lesson and one Museum visit

Duration

Grades K–3: one hour
Grades 4–12: 75 min.

Duration in Classroom
One period long
Group Size
Up to 30 students; three to five chaperones
Who

K–12 students

Fees
See Fees
Booking
Four weeks advance notice required
Notes
Monday–Friday only. NYC Schools only.
Sound Amplification Available
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Three-Part Program

One in-school pre-visit lesson, one MoMA visit, and one in-school post-visit lesson
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Learn more about the visit.

Once your visit is scheduled, a MoMA educator will contact you to further tailor the visit and lesson to meet your needs.

What

Two in-school lessons (pre- and post-visit) and one Museum visit

Duration at MoMA

Grades K–3: One hour
Grades 4–12: 75 min.

Duration in Classroom
One period long
Group Size
Up to 30 students; three to five chaperones
Who

K–12 students

Fees
See Fees
Booking
Four weeks advance notice required
Notes
Monday–Friday only. NYC Schools only.
Sound Amplification Available
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Partnerships

For schools interested in partnership programs
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These may involve multi-visit programs, professional development, and customized, in-person curriculum planning.

E-mail us at schoolprograms@moma.org.

To review a sample partnership, visit the project website of the MoMA/Academy of American studies partnership.

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Unguided K–12 Group Admission

Enter the galleries in groups of ten to sixty students at a dedicated arrival time slot exclusively for your group.
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Please note that this is a group admission option. Non-MoMA staff are prohibited from lecturing to student groups in the galleries.

Group Size

10–60 students and chaperones

Time

Pre-arranged and dedicated arrival time slot for your group

Note
Non-MoMA staff are prohibited from lecturing to student groups in the galleries.
Sound Amplification Available
Themes Recommended for Elementary School (Grades K–5)

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Characters

Explore the different decisions artists make when representing a figure as their subject
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Students might discuss portrait attributes, material, form, narrative, and other related concepts.

Sample Lesson Activity

Explore the different decisions artists make when representing people. Students might discuss portrait attributes, symbolism, identity, or form and narrative.

Who

Elementary School (K-5)

Fees
See Fees
Lesson ideas include
Portraiture, Character and Narrative, Dialogue, Body Language, Leadership, Relationships
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Spaces and Places

Discover the different ways artists represent place.
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Students might discuss how artists create a sense of place, their environments, landscapes, or the different kinds of spaces we inhabit.

Sample Lesson Activity

Examine how artists represent space abstractly. Explore Piet Mondrian's Broadway Boogie Woogie, which was inspired by New York City, by drawing a place of your own using only the colors, shapes, and lines you think represent the experience of that place.

Who

Elementary School (K-5)

Fees
See Fees
Lesson ideas include
Landscapes and Cityscapes, Community, Public and Private Spaces, Buildings
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Everyday Objects

Examine everyday objects used or depicted in works of art.
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Students might compare and contrast art and design objects and explore the concepts of form and function.

Sample Lesson Activity

Before viewing Dalí's Retrospective Bust of a Woman, examine a list of the sculpture's components (ants, woman, bread, etc.). Draw your own image combining these elements, and then compare it with Dalí's.

Who

Elementary School (K-5)

Fees
See Fees
Lesson ideas include
Still Lifes, Everyday Objects, Design Objects, Sculpture and Materials, Found Objects
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Museums and Collecting: How MoMA Works

Get an inside look at how the MoMA functions
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Students might explore ideas around building a collection; the Museum's architecture as part of the collection; or art installation, curatorial practice, and other museum jobs.

Sample Lesson Activity

After discussing Panel for Edwin R. Campbell No. 4, ask students to consider what it illustrates about MoMA's collection in general. What other kinds of objects might be in a collection with this one?

Who

Elementary School (K-5)

Fees
See Fees
Lesson ideas include
Collecting, Curating, Architecture and Installation
Sound Amplification Available
Themes Recommended for Middle and High School (Grades 6–12)

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Identity

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Examine how art conveys identity through the lenses of symbolism, context, and students' own perceptions of contemporary culture. Students might focus on individual and community identity, symbolism, personal environments, or memory.

Sample Lesson Activity

Explore identity through text. Consider how the song lyrics in Self-Portrait with Cropped Hair relate to Frida Kahlo's biography, then share contemporary lyrics that reflect your own personal story.

Who

Grades K–12

Fees
See Fees
Lesson ideas include
Individual Identity, Community Identity, Symbolism, Personal Environments, Memoir
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Narrative in Art

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Discover the narrative, language, poetry, and symbols of art, or focus on the interaction between literature, text, and art.

Sample Lesson Activity

Explore narrative in works of art by writing an interior monologue for the female subject in Wyeth's Christina's World.

Who

Grades K–12

Fees
See Fees
Lesson ideas include
Specific Mediums, Experimentation, Breaking Tradition, Form and Textures, Process
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Art Redefined

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Explore artists' conceptual processes and examine issues of artistic intention, interpretation, and debate while challenging different definitions of art.

Sample Lesson Activity

After discussing how Duchamp challenges traditional notions of art, work in teams to defend or challenge the artist's statement, "I don’t believe in art. I believe in artists."

Who

Grades K–12

Fees
See Fees
Lesson ideas include
Artistic Intention, Art Criticism, Controversy, Innovation, Materials and Form
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Materials and Process

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Discuss the visual effects of artistic mediums and processes, as well as innovations and variations in how they are practiced.

Sample Lesson Activity

Explore how artists push the boundaries of different mediums by debating in small groups whether Bed is a painting or a sculpture.

Who

Grades K–12

Fees
See Fees
Lesson ideas include
Specific Mediums, Experimentation, Breaking Tradition, Form and Textures, Process
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Society and Politics

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Examine specific works of art in relation to the social and political contexts in which they were created. Students are encouraged to reflect on how artists interpret and represent different experiences and events

Sample Lesson Activity

Using Claes Oldenburg's "Empire" ("Papa") Ray Gun as a point of departure, consider how artists represent different power relationships. Draw your own symbol of power, then pass it to a classmate who will add to the drawing to make the symbol less powerful.

Who

Grades K–12

Fees
See Fees
Lesson ideas include
Communities, Conflict, Power and Representation, Identity and Politics
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The Modern Lens: Looking at Art from 1880 to Today

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Explore the concept of modernity and the art-historical category of modernism. Students examine continuities and changes in genres such as portraiture or landscape painting over time. Consider the impact of individual artistic practices, and examine social and historical contexts.

Sample Lesson Activity

Investigate how artists abstract the human form. Draw all four sides of Umberto Boccioni's Unique Forms of Continuity in Space in timed intervals.

Who

Grades K–12

Fees
See Fees
Lesson ideas include
The Human Figure, Environments, Design, Artist Study
Resources

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Teachers

Online Resources for Teachers
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Teachers

Use these to learn more about objects, look for pre- or post-visit activities to do with your students, or print out images of what you viewed at the Museum to hang in the classroom.

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Parents/ Chaperones

Online Resources for Chaperones
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Chaperones

Chaperones provide a vital support to Museum trips. We appreciate what chaperones do to ensure smooth and productive learning experiences.

Chaperones can help spread the word about family visits to MoMA.

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Students

Online Resources for Students
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Students

Curious about what the Museum has to offer? Check out these online activities before your next visit.

About Us

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Jessica Baldenhofer

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Jessica oversees school visit programs at MoMA. She considers working with the Museum’s diverse student and teacher populations extremely rewarding and strives to make modern and contemporary art accessible and useful for teaching many subject areas, while also providing students with meaningful experiences with works of art. She has great respect for the commitment MoMA’s school educators have to their teaching practice and audiences. In 2002, Jessica wrote Come Look with Me: Exploring Modern Art, a book designed to help teachers and parents talk about art with children. Prior to working at MoMA, she oversaw on-site school visits at the Guggenheim Museum and the New-York Historical Society. She has a BA in art history from William & Mary, an MA in art history from Richmond University in London, and an MS.Ed in museum education from Bank Street College.

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Francis Estrada

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Francis is the assistant educator for School Visits Programs at MoMA. He is an artist and educator who assists in the coordination and administration of MoMA’s school visits programs. He has a fine arts degree in painting and drawing from San Jose State University, and has taught in a variety of studio, classroom, and museum settings to diverse audiences, including programs for adults with disabilities, cultural institutions, and after-school programs. He was also an administrator and educator at the Museum for African Art, where he enjoyed teaching about the amalgamation of art and culture through objects. Francis exhibits his work nationally, including online publications, and focuses on culture, history, and perception.

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Lisa Mazzola

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Lisa is the assistant director of School and Teacher Programs at MoMA. She develops and administers programs and resources for K–12 educators, students, and schools that incorporate and integrate MoMA’s collection into classroom teaching practices across disciplines. Her favorite part of the job is being in the galleries with teachers and students, and hearing them share with each other about what they are experiencing. Prior to her work at MoMA, Lisa coordinated gallery education and special projects at the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum in New York City and the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. In addition, Lisa spent three years as an art and design educator/consultant developing residency programs in NYC public schools.

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Jackie Delamatre

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Jackie

Jackie is a freelance educator at several NYC museums, including the Guggenheim Museum and the Whitney Museum of American Art. She also writes curricula for the Guggenheim Bilbao and teaches fiction to adults in the evenings. Previously, she taught high school in the South Bronx and coordinated a research study on the effect of arts education on literacy skills. She has a BA from Brown University and an MFA in fiction from New York University, and she hails from the Crescent City, New Orleans.

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Mark Epstein

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Mark is an artist and educator living in Brooklyn. He also teaches at Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum and the Brooklyn Museum. He received his BFA from the Museum School of Fine Arts and Tufts University, taking a year out of his degree to study architecture at Ontario College of Art and Design. His MFA with distinction is from the Slade School of Fine Art, University College London. Recent residencies include the Macdowell Colony and the Jentel Foundation. In his teaching, Mark relishes investigating with students the artist's process and the content of the artist’s work.

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Emily Gibson

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Emily has taught gallery- and studio-based classes in museums and schools throughout NYC, including the Guggenheim Museum, Studio in a School, and public schools in Harlem and the South Bronx. She sees learning about art as an opportunity for students to explore complex realms of human experience, and hopes to inspire them to imagine solutions for the situations that challenge them. When not engaged with students, she can be found working in her studio. She earned her BFA from the Maryland Institute, her teaching certification through Pratt, and her MFA from the Massachusetts College of Art. As a graduate student, she traveled and studied Eastern art, spending time in Shanghai, Beijing, and Tokyo.

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Rachel Farmer

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Rachel is an artist and musician with over a decade of experience in art and museum education. With an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, she has held positions at the Chicago Children’s Museum and the Museum of Arts and Design and has taught studio art at various NYC public schools and community centers through Studio in a School and the Joan Mitchell Foundation. She also works in documentary film, serving as associate producer on Kings Park, a documentary feature currently in post-production.

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Lisa Libicki

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Lisa has taught school, family, and educator programs at NYC museums for the past seven years, and has developed numerous online and print museum-based curriculum resources for teachers. Lisa discovered her love of museum education in college, while working at the Williams College Museum of Art and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. When not teaching, she enjoys taking art classes, traveling, and exploring all that NYC has to offer. Originally from the City of Angels, Los Angeles, she received her BA in art history from Williams College before moving to NYC.

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Sally Paul

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Sally Paul is a visual artist and educator who was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She fell in love with museum education as an intern at the Brooklyn Museum of Art, and has been working in the field since. She currently facilitates School Programs and Community and Access Programs at MoMA. Additionally, she is a freelance educator at the International Center of Photography and the American Museum of Folk Art. She has held positions at the Brooklyn Museum of Art, the Bronx Museum of the Arts, and the Brooklyn Children’s Museum. She received a BFA from Pratt Institute and an MA in art education from New York University.

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Stina Puotinen

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Stina Puotinen has been a museum educator for nearly 10 years. She received her BA in art history at Vassar College in 2004 and began her tenure at the Brooklyn Museum the same year. She has worked as an educator at several leading arts institutions in New York City—including the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum, the Brooklyn Museum, the Jewish Museum, and the Noguchi Museum—and at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Before joining MoMA's School Programs team, she was Senior Coordinator of Family Programs at the Whitney Museum of American Art, where she developed programs, resources, and Web content for ages 14 and under. Literally and ideologically born out of her work in museums are projects such as the recently launched creative collaborative and curatorial production team Limited Time Only, and CHERYL, a four-member, semi-anonymous, often cat-masked artist collective based in Brooklyn, of which she is cofounder and co-artistic director.

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Kristin Roeder

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Kristin deeply values the diverse viewpoints visitors bring to MoMA’s galleries, where she facilitates both School Programs and Family Programs. For nearly a decade, she has developed and taught educational programs at institutions including the New York Botanical Garden, the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, and San Francisco’s Exploratorium, where she studied with the Institute for Inquiry. During a residency at Hedgebrook Writers’ Colony, Kristin cemented her commitment to wordplay and rhyme, which she explores in her steel sculptures and songwriting. A fortune cookie recently presented Kristin with the wise words, “It is better to ask questions than to know all of the answers.” She has found that this exquisitely reflects the experience of MoMA visitors and educators, who continually discover the value of a question mark during the process of constructing meaning.

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Kate Sutlive

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Kate

Kate is an educator who sees art as a powerful form of communication. She believes that a museum is a wonderful place to consider the experience of others, to encourage curiosity and connections, and to show respect to individual voices. She enjoys guiding group conversations that build upon observations, explore ideas, and consider contexts to support developing interpretations of art. Kate currently teaches discussion-based programs for adults, teens, and school groups at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. She previously interned with the education department at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and taught at a Montessori school in Athens, Georgia. She is working though the MS.Ed program in museum education at Bank Street College of Education, and holds a MA in art history from Boston University and a BA in art history from Mount Holyoke College.

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Nate Sensel

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Nathan is a teaching artist who has worked with the city’s youth for the past 12 years, cultivating communication and collaboration through the arts. He developed and implemented the Apprentice Program at the Brooklyn Museum, overseeing its growth from a summer program to a yearlong internship. He is the coordinator for the ArtsLife program at the Museum of Arts and Design, teaches drawing at the Brooklyn Museum, and facilitates a reviewers and critics class through High 5. This past summer he co-led a study abroad to South Africa and he has supervised student art teachers at City College. Since 2006 he has been dedicated to supporting future artists and arts enthusiasts through the conversations and activities that take place at MoMA.

Fees


Type of Visit NYC Public HS NYC Title 1* Public K–8 NYC Non-Title-1* Public K–8 All Other Schools
One-Part MoMA Visit Free Free $60 $200
Art Studio $350 $350 $350 $350
Two-Part Program (NYC only) Free Free $105 $325
Three-Part Program (NYC only) Free Free $150 $400
Modern Teachers Visit $55 $55 $55 $55
Basic Group Admission $5 per student + $15 per adult $5 per student + $15 per adult $5 per student + $15 per adult $9 per student + $20 per adult

* Title 1 is a national program that provides funding to schools with high percentages of children from low-income families. Approximately 70 percent of New York City public schools receive Title 1 funding.

Payment

Payment for School Programs is due upon arrival or in advance of services rendered. Accepted forms of payment include New York City Department of Education Purchase Orders, cash, checks, Visa, American Express, or MasterCard. Please make checks payable to The Museum of Modern Art. MoMA’s tax ID number is 13-1624100; DoE contract number QR164CH; DoE vendor code MID 015.

Cancellations and Refunds

Cancellation requests must be made in writing no fewer than two weeks in advance of your visit. A processing fee for cancellations may apply. Please e-mail or fax your request.

Scheduling Infomation


In advance of scheduling, gather the following information:

  1. School and mailing address
  2. Teacher name(s) and grade
  3. At least two forms of teacher contact information (e.g., school phone, home phone, cell phone, e-mail address). Educators will contact teachers in advance of lessons to discuss themes and content.
  4. Number of classes and students (up to thirty students per group; smaller classes may not be combined to form a larger group of over thirty participants).
  5. Number of chaperones (up to five chaperones per class; a minimum of one adult per ten students)
Frequently Asked Questions


Can my class stay in the Museum after my guided visit?
Yes, your class may stay at MoMA after their visit on Mondays through Fridays. After the tour, your class will receive entrance tickets and may come and go freely for the rest of the day. We recommend chaperones and students to divide themselves into smaller groups as large groups cannot be accommodated in the Galleries at the same time. Also, your class may not enter MoMA early before your designated tour start time.

Where can I eat my lunch?
Unfortunately, as MoMA doesn’t have lunchroom facilities for students, you will be responsible for finding a place to eat. Here is a partial list of public spaces in midtown where students may eat lunch.

Where do I check in?
Arrive fifteen minutes before your scheduled start time to check-in at the Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Education and Research Building at 4 West Fifty-fourth Street, between Fifth and Sixth avenues. Once you’ve booked a visit with Group Services, they will send you a confirmation package that details all of the logistical information.

How many students can fit in a group?
The maximum group size is thirty students, with a few exceptions. Smaller classes may not be combined to compose a group that’s larger than thirty students.

How many chaperones should I bring?
We recommend bringing one chaperone for every ten students. One group may not have more than five chaperones.

What should my students bring?
Students don’t need to bring anything; we’ll provide all necessary supplies. Students will check their belongings when they arrive, so they should not bring any valuables to their MoMA visit.

What if we’re late?
If your group is late, your program will be shorted accordingly, and finish at the originally designated time. Groups more than thirty minutes late will be canceled.

What if I need to cancel my tour?
All cancellations must be received in writing at least two weeks prior to the scheduled visit. Please review our full cancellation policy on your confirmation letter and contact Group Services at groupservices@moma.org or (212) 708-9685 with any questions. Cancellation and other processing fees may apply.